What Does WorldRanking Mean?

What Does It Mean To Compete in a World Ranking Show?

FEIF - Passion for the Icelandic Horse

The FEIF WorldRanking is a system to compare results between riders of pure-bred Icelandic horses at selected sport events all over the world.

The position of a rider in any class in the FEIF WorldRanking is based upon the arithmetic mean of their three best results with a horse in a class.• Any rider will need at least three scores (that is why we are running three separate one-day shows for the October show) of 5.50 or higher in the preliminary rounds of the track classes Tölt T1, Tölt T2, Four Gait V1, Five Gait F1, Tölt T3, Tölt T4, Four Gait V2, Five Gait F2 (our F2O), and Pace Test PP1–or the equivalent time in SpeedPass P2 (8.70″)–in order to qualify for the WorldRanking.

Any rider will need at least three scores (that is why we are running three separate one-day shows for the October show) of 5.50 or higher in the preliminary rounds of the track classes Tölt T1, Tölt T2, Four Gait V1, Five Gait F1, Tölt T3, Tölt T4, Four Gait V2, Five Gait F2 (our F2O), and Pace Test PP1–or the equivalent time in SpeedPass P2 (8.70″)–in order to qualify for the WorldRanking.

A WR tournament is judged by at least 5 Sport Judges; 3 of them must be FEIF International Sport Judges. -→ At our show in October, we will provide 5 FEIF International Sport Judges!

The highest and the lowest mark of the judges will be disregarded; the final mark is based on the average of the remaining three marks.

Results are valid for a period of two years.

For More Information, go to: https://www.feif.org/Sport/WorldRanking.aspx

Competition Clinic Takes Participants To Their Next Step (August 12-13)

August 12-13: Newbies and seasoned professionals gathered together at Lettleiki Icelandics this weekend to view and learn from the Icelandic Horse World Championships being broadcast from The Netherlands. Alex Dannenmann, an International Sport Judge and certified Icelandic horse trainer, provided insight and answered participant questions as they learned more about ideal presentation, scoring, and Icelandic horses in general. Screen time was interspersed with on-site lessons where riders could practice some of the techniques and concepts just learned to reach the next step in their mastery of the art.